The Sociopathic 1 Percent: The Driving Force at the Heart of the Tea Party

The Sociopathic 1 Percent: The Driving Force at the Heart of the Tea Party
http://www.alternet.org/economy/sociopathic-1-percent-driving-force-hear...
Quote from article:
"It’s been argued that psychopaths have been taken to be more commonly criminal, even violent, and the result of genetic hard-wiring, whereas sociopaths are interpersonally rather than physically destructive, and the result of a difficult or abusive childhood. This is has little impact or no impact on the present discussion. It’s also been argued that sociopaths have a sense of morality, only it’s a different one than the rest of society, perhaps, in which selfishness is a virtue, and altruism a vice, as per Ayn Rand. This is relevant to this discussion, as the influence of psychopaths on the larger society clearly involves altering, if not violently reversing the common sense of morality. That’s why I will tend to use the terms interchangeably in a broad sense, reflecting the usage of the experts I’m referencing, but favor ‘psychopathy’ with respect to specific behavior and ‘sociopathy’ to describe broader societal impacts. There is also a further small subset of psychopaths who deserve special attention: those who are serial killers (not that all serial killers are psychopaths — they aren’t). As it happens, Ayn Rand chose a serial killer as the model for the protagonist of her first novel, which means that we cannot honestly ignore this small, but vividly illustrative sub-population."

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The working class is commonly subjected to so many taxes, and each tax is so high, that about 40% of their income is summarily confiscated from all taxes and fees imposed by 3 or more levels of government. Add it up for yourself. Anyone can plug numbers into a spreadsheet and see roughly their real tax load, as long as you're honest with yourself and include them all:

federal income tax
federal Social Security tax
federal Medicare tax
federal fees (licenses, etc.)
state income tax
state sales tax
state fees (licenses, etc.)
county sales tax
county property tax
city income tax
city fees (licenses, etc.)
utility taxes
gasoline taxes
cigarette taxes
insurance taxes

... and that's probably not complete. So hey, working class: DO THE MATH. Open up a simple spreadsheet and do what the Liberals sweat bullets about: Enter in your income and then start subtracting all that crap. Figure out your % tax load. It's gonna be a whopper.

So who are the real sociopaths here? The taxing authorities. The politicians who direct them. And the hordes of demented Liberals who vote in tax-and-spenders, and who love to tax people, as long as it's not themselves.

Boeing and its stockholders fly high on tax dollars
http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2014/2/corporate-welfaresubsidiesb...
Quote:
"State and local governments have awarded at least $110 billion in taxpayer subsidies to business, with 3 of every 4 dollars going to fewer than 1,000 big corporations, the most thorough analysis to date of corporate welfare revealed today.
Boeing ranks first, with 137 subsidies totaling $13.2 billion, followed by Alcoa at $5.6 billion, Intel at $3.9 billion, General Motors at $3.5 billion and Ford Motor at $2.5 billion, the new report by the nonprofit research organization Good Jobs First shows.
Dow Chemical had the most subsidies, 410 totaling $1.4 billion, followed by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire-Hathaway holding company, with 310 valued at $1.1 billion.
The figures were compiled from disclosures made by state and local government agencies that subsidize companies in all sorts of ways, including cash giveaways, building and land transfers, tax abatements and steep discounts on electric and water bills."

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

Boeing and its stockholders fly high on tax dollars
http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2014/2/corporate-welfaresubsidiesb...
Quote:
"We know far too little about taxpayer support for business because of the ways governments do and do not collect data.
Federal, state and local governments publish exhaustively detailed statistical reports on welfare to the poor, disabled, sick, elderly and other individuals who cannot support themselves. The cost of subsidized food, housing and medical care are all documented at government expense, with the statistics posted on government websites.
But corporate welfare is not the subject of any comprehensive reporting at the federal level. Disclosures by state and local governments vary greatly, from substantial to nearly nonexistent.
Good Jobs First has prodded some states to expand disclosures. In many cases, though, the amounts and terms of corporate welfare are unknown because state and local governments assert that the information is confidential.

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

The biggest example of corporate welfare was the Auto bailouts!

MikeyA

and would have also gotten the money that ended up going to the auto industry if they could have it totally their way.

I wasn't talking in terms of dollars.

MikeyA

Two years ago, this idiot claimed there was no such thing as the Tea Party, now him and the rest of the liberals are terrified of it.

Of course he's terrified. All Liberals live in mortal terror that their nanny state will finally hit the wall, and not expand to fill all economic niches. Then "injustice" (i.e. people keeping their own money and doing their own thing) will persist. Heavens!

The fact that Tea Party members socialized, that is came together in common cause, gives lie to the linked story's premise that they are individualism absolutists.

Patience is a great virtue.

Yawn

The biggest example of corporate welfare was the Halliburton bailout which necessitated
our country getting involved in two wars to pay for those $500 bottles of water that Halli/chaneyburton were supplying to our troops.

Your ignorance of the issue is displayed in your post.

Halliburton was not given the contract in Afghanistan. Likewise the KBR contract was only one year in term where it was renegotiated and put up for bid again. DynCorps and FLUOR are also notable private military contractors who specialize in construction in competition with KBR, they couldn't fulfill the terms of the contract when they submitted.

DynCorps notably won the LOGCAP II contract that included Afghanistan.

As someone who was in Afghanistans and I got to see all three companies work. FLUOR and later DynCorps handled American services, KBR the british services. KBR provided far better services with much greater reliability.

Do you know what it costs to feel a person in one of these countries? I can tell you. It's not cheap.

MikeyA

Can't you just fondle an Afghani for free? LOL!

No, you can't. They charge for everything over there.

Patience is a great virtue.

10 companies profiting the most from war
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2013/03/10/10-companies-pro...

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

Progressive Liberals and throw in some Republicans....

"DTOM" {1776} " We The People" {1791}

Psychopaths and sociopaths could flourish in congress and the Senate and here at swamp bubbles...AS WELL

"DTOM" {1776} " We The People" {1791}

Glen Beck
National Rally for America
http://archive.glennbeck.com/home/rally.shtml

http://archive.glennbeck.com/news/04212003.shtml

Ten years on: Remember the Rally for America?
http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/2013/03/ten-years-on-remember-rally-for-a...
Quote:

These "rallies for America" were cited all over the news that day ten years ago as a counter point to the anti-war marches. But there was a little difference that nobody mentioned:

They look like spontaneous expressions of pro-war sentiment, "patriotic rallies" drawing crowds of tens of thousands across the American heartland.
In a counterpoint to anti-war demonstrations, supporters of war in Iraq have descended on cities from Fort Wayne to Cleveland, and Atlanta to Philadelphia. They wave flags, messages of support for the troops - and also banners attacking liberals, excoriating the UN, and in one case, advising: "Bomb France Now."

But many of the rallies, it turns out, have been organised and paid for by Clear Channel Inc - the country's largest radio conglomerate, owning 1,200 stations - which is not only reporting on the war at the same time, but whose close links with President Bush stretch back to his earliest, much-criticised financial dealings as governor of Texas. The company has paid advertising costs and for the hire of musicians for the rallies.

Tom Hicks, Clear Channel's vice-chairman, is a past donor to Bush's political campaigning. The two were at the centre of a scandal when Mr Bush was governor and when Mr Hicks chaired a University of Texas investment board that awarded large investment-management contracts to several companies close to the Bush family - including the Carlyle Group, on whose payroll Mr Bush had been until weeks previously, and which still retains his father.

"Should this be happening? No," said Dante Chinni, a senior associate with the Project for Excellence in Journalism, a Columbia University programme based in Washington. "What kind of company is Clear Channel? What's their mission? Are they a media company, a promotional company? For some people, Clear Channel's reporting, for want of a better word, may be the reporting that they're getting on the war in Iraq."

Amir Forester, a spokeswoman for Premiere Radio Networks, a subsidiary of Clear Channel, said the rallies - which the company calls "patriotic", not "pro-war" - were the idea of Glenn Beck, a syndicated talk radio host.

It was a good model. Fox took it up for the Tea Party.

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

Glen Beck
National Rally for America
http://archive.glennbeck.com/home/rally.shtml

http://archive.glennbeck.com/news/04212003.shtml

Ten years on: Remember the Rally for America?
http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/2013/03/ten-years-on-remember-rally-for-a...
Quote:

These "rallies for America" were cited all over the news that day ten years ago as a counter point to the anti-war marches. But there was a little difference that nobody mentioned:

They look like spontaneous expressions of pro-war sentiment, "patriotic rallies" drawing crowds of tens of thousands across the American heartland.
In a counterpoint to anti-war demonstrations, supporters of war in Iraq have descended on cities from Fort Wayne to Cleveland, and Atlanta to Philadelphia. They wave flags, messages of support for the troops - and also banners attacking liberals, excoriating the UN, and in one case, advising: "Bomb France Now."

But many of the rallies, it turns out, have been organised and paid for by Clear Channel Inc - the country's largest radio conglomerate, owning 1,200 stations - which is not only reporting on the war at the same time, but whose close links with President Bush stretch back to his earliest, much-criticised financial dealings as governor of Texas. The company has paid advertising costs and for the hire of musicians for the rallies.

Tom Hicks, Clear Channel's vice-chairman, is a past donor to Bush's political campaigning. The two were at the centre of a scandal when Mr Bush was governor and when Mr Hicks chaired a University of Texas investment board that awarded large investment-management contracts to several companies close to the Bush family - including the Carlyle Group, on whose payroll Mr Bush had been until weeks previously, and which still retains his father.

"Should this be happening? No," said Dante Chinni, a senior associate with the Project for Excellence in Journalism, a Columbia University programme based in Washington. "What kind of company is Clear Channel? What's their mission? Are they a media company, a promotional company? For some people, Clear Channel's reporting, for want of a better word, may be the reporting that they're getting on the war in Iraq."

Amir Forester, a spokeswoman for Premiere Radio Networks, a subsidiary of Clear Channel, said the rallies - which the company calls "patriotic", not "pro-war" - were the idea of Glenn Beck, a syndicated talk radio host.

It was a good model. Fox took it up for the Tea Party.

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

The outrage of military contractors making money off the military!

Where was Haliburton? I thought they were the biggest profiteers having started 2 wars. LOL

MikeyA

What's going on with the site that it says it's down, asks you to resend the info, then double posts?

MikeyA

You also realize the cuts in the force you've advocated for actually cause our forces to become more reliant upon private military contractors.

Relevant: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/mar/25/pacific-commander-us-lac...

MikeyA

Do you also realize the social welfare going on in the military by them using tax payer money to keep thousands of so called "soldiers" like yourself on the payroll for shuffling paper work around. The military is bailing out smucks like yourself who couldn't go out in the real world and get a job.

Awwww did I hurt your feelings LN?

Or did the military when they told you you couldn't join because you didn't have your GED yet?

It's ok. Just because you didn't serve doesn't mean your a bad person or that we don't like you. We don't like you because you smell like a goat's a$$hole.

MikeyA

I bet fuzznut has a job that doesn't require being able to do a single pushup, or anything else physical.

I would be surprised if he has a criminal record as well.

MikeyA

I can see what's happening, here. Mr Not-So-Independent is in mortal terror. The first post starkly showed that working Americans are overtaxed. Tax enough. Taxed enough... ALREADY.

The list shows from 12 to 15 taxes that working Ohioans are already subjected to. I named them. So he's horrified that it's a short step or two to put that list into a spreadsheet and after playing around with one's pay stubs and checkbook, one can find out the tax load under this fiscally liberal, frankly predatory government.

So he's cut-n-pasted here numerous times, desperate to distract people reading from figuring that out. That's the Liberal goal: To keep fooling people long enough so that they have no choice but to wake up as slaves on the continent their fathers conquered.

(duplicate post)

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