Black Discrimination in America

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Really interesting video, also very misleading. The car is parked on two different streets in the video yet it clearly says two minutes later. One is parked along a section of the Hollywood Walk of Fame which runs through some very tough neighborhoods in places, the other is clearly businesses and has parking meters and no trees unlike the second street. This is clearly a set up and the editing showing the people looking worried could be shot at any time of day. This would be more powerful if it were a shot from further back and were done on the same car on the same street two minutes apart, it clearly isn't.
If his intent is to show that cops would only respond if it were a black man he didn't even succeed there. Ignore the fact that the car has been moved. The cops could have been called when the white guy was breaking in, and it took them two minutes to get there by which time the black guy is at the car. But even that didn't happen since the car was moved.

Any statement I make is the opinion of me exercising my first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and is generally permitted.

Source:
Toledo Blade
Sunday 2/23/2014

Letter-to-the-Editor

Social media lessons about racism
Last summer, I joined our neighborhood watch Facebook page and almost immediately regretted it. We were experiencing a rash of petty crime: A ladder missing from a front yard or cars being rifled through during the night — some of them had been broken into, but most were already unlocked.
Suddenly, the Facebook page was rife with warnings about otherwise unidentified “black males” guilty of everything from walking down the block and looking into car windows to driving past open garages and peering in. The frequency of these posts was unnerving. I was especially perplexed by the congratulatory nature of the comments below these posts, praising the poster for “vigilance.”
None of these suspected individuals’ crimes was substantiated. And as best I could tell, these black males, most likely teenagers, were no more likely than any of the white teenagers strolling through our neighborhood to be guilty of anything.
We possess the same unwillingness to root out our prejudice, because it is hard, and none of us wants to be considered racist.
As white people, we have the privilege to ignore where the system is unjust for people of color and to deny where we directly benefit from it. But if we can all agree that we do not want racism in our neighborhoods, we must root it out.
Rooting it out starts with revealing ugly truths about ourselves, then having uncomfortable conversations.
Racism will never end if each of us doesn’t make an earnest attempt at listening. Listening means not speaking. It means quietly considering where we are at fault, then making direct, conscious action to eliminate those faults.

ANDREA CARDINAL

Read more at http://www.toledoblade.com/Letters-to-the-Editor/2014/02/23/Social-media...

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again------>what this Country needs is a meaningful discussion on Race. How many times do we have to listen this sort of thing? What I mean here, is what racial issues have NOT been discussed?

Ian Haney López on the Dog Whistle Politics of Race
http://billmoyers.com/episode/ian-haney-lopez-on-the-dog-whistle-politic...

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

What this country needs is for people to stop being racists.

What this country needs more, is to build bigger and better prisons.

Who's going to pay for the guards who work in those prisons? Who's going to pay all of the other costs of running those prisons?
Sounds like another conservative tax and spend government operation to me.

than it does to educate a student on average in America. This is from that far-left Fox News website.
In addition, the figures vary greatly, but most authorities assess the illiteracy rate among prisoners as greater than 60%. One source, another far-left organization, the Junior League of Oklahoma City, listed this national statistic: "85% of all juveniles who interface with the judicial court system are functionally illiterate." I do apologize for posting statistics. I know how much ideologues HATE statistics!

These statistics alone don't tell the whole story. If we, as a nation, choose to spend more educating young people, less desperate illiterates will feel it necessary to turn to crime. Not only does that save incarceration costs, but it diminishes harm and fear among the general population, as we concurrently create a higher percentage of better educated taxpayers, in lieu of illiterate tax users. In addition, how many more functional families will be created where dysfunctional families would have been, if we better educate more of our youth?
Education is an investment in a better future for us all. We save tax dollars while we salvage lives and families! Talk about your family values!! Education is truly a win-win.

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