ALERT!!!! General Motors offers incentives to Toyota owners worried by recall

General Motors offers incentives to Toyota owners worried by recall
Bring in a Camry, for example, and get $1000 off this 2010 Chevrolet Malibu LT.
By GM, Wieck
General Motors launched a campaign today to give Toyota owners worried about the ongoing recall over sticking gas pedals extra incentive to consider buying a GM vehicle.
http://content.usatoday.com/communities/driveon/post/2010/01/general-mot...

Steve Hill, general manager of retail sales support, told Drive On colleagues Tim Higgins and Jewer Gopwani of the Detroit Free Press that GM dealers were being inundated by Toyota owners concerned about the recall and looking for help: "Starting last night and certainly into today, we're just getting barraged by phone calls from our dealers and our field personnel telling us about … customers from Toyota calling and stopping in. They have a lot of questions; they're looking for help."

So GM crafted a crafty incentive program aimed at those owners, who may have at some time owned a GM product. "A lot of these customers were our customers … and we want to provide help," Hill said.

Jake Fisher, senior automotive engineer at Consumer Reports, said this is a rare opportunity for GM, "It's very difficult to pry someone away from Toyota," said Fisher. He expects similar incentives by other automakers because a customer "might not just buy that vehicle, but buy that manufacturer down the road."

The GM incentives, good through the end February, include:

* Toyota lease holders can get up to $1,000 in lease payments to terminate their Toyota lease and buy or lease a GM vehicle. It applies to Chevrolet, Cadillac, Buick and GMC vehicles.
* Financing buyers can get 0% interest rates for 60 months on most GM vehicles.
* Cash buyers can get $1,000 down-payment assistance to get into a GM vehicle.
* And the Toyota trade-in doesn't have to be on the recall list, said Hill. "It applies to any Toyota owner."

-- Fred Meier/Automotive Editor

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3 car rental companies pull Toyotas from fleets
Associated Press
http://detnews.com/article/20100127/AUTO01/1270437
New York -- Three car rental companies said Wednesday they are pulling thousands of Toyotas from their fleets over faulty gas pedals.

The Pontiac Vibe, made by General Motors Co. in conjunction with Toyota, has also been recalled and will be removed from service by Enterprise Holdings, which operates the Alamo Rent A Car, Enterprise Rent-A-Car and National Car Rental chains.

Toyota Motor Co. announced Tuesday that it was suspending sales and halting production of eight models following last week's recall to repair sticking gas pedals that could make the cars and trucks accelerate without warning.

From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20100127/AUTO01/1270437#ixzz0dslaahQc

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

I urge all Toyota owners to copy the following and attach to the windshield visor. Go though the check list with ALL family members (wife, children, grandmother, etc.) of the dangers posed by driving the deadly Toyota family car or truck..

Toyota Motor Corp. and experts have advice for drivers if a vehicle's accelerator pedal sticks:
Basic advice
First, brake hard. Then put the car in neutral. When you come to a stop, turn off the engine.
The engine may keep revving loudly while you try to stop, but don't turn it off if you can avoid it.
Turning off the engine means you lose power-assisted steering and brakes, and if you turn the key too far, you could lock the steering wheel.
Don't pump the brakes. Press firmly and steadily.
Toyota warns that pumping the brake pedal will deplete the vacuum assist, which boosts the braking force using power from the engine.
If that's depleted, you'll need to put much stronger pressure on the brake pedal and it still might not be enough force to stop.
If all else fails, turn off the engine.
If you can't put the vehicle in neutral, then turn the engine off. This will not cause loss of steering or braking control, but the power assist to these systems will be lost.

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

TOYOTA RECALL
Camry red flag raised in 2004
Tight limits put on probe of problem, suit claims
http://www.freep.com/article/20100128/BUSINESS01/1280466/1319/Camry-red-...
BY GREG GARDNER
FREE PRESS BUSINESS WRITER

As early as 2004, authorities investigated reports of unintended acceleration in Toyota's best-selling model, the Camry.

But the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration looked at incidents lasting only 1 second or less.

That limit came after a former official who went to work for Toyota shortly before the investigation began was involved in discussions with former colleagues at the safety agency, according to documents in a lawsuit filed by the estate of Guadalupe Alberto of Flint, who died in 2008 when she lost control of her 2005 Camry.
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I suggest the beleaguered Toyota owners take their unsafe vehicle to a local car radio shop that installs remote car starters and have them install a "kill" switch that attaches to the drivers wrist. This will be the only way that the vehicle can be safely driven without worrying loved ones. The current system of an electronically controlled accelerator will never be as safe as the old system of a cable control.

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

IT WAS NOT THE MATS & ITS NOT THE PEDAL

The Times found that complaints of sudden acceleration in many Toyota and Lexus vehicles shot up almost immediately after the automaker adopted the so-called drive-by-wire system over the past decade. That system uses sensors, microprocessors and electric motors to connect the driver's foot to the engine, rather than a traditional link such as a steel cable.
For some Toyota models, reports of unintended acceleration increased more than five-fold after drive-by-wire systems were adopted, according to the review of thousands of consumer complaints filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
Toyota first installed electronic throttles in 2002 model year Lexus ES and Toyota Camry sedans. Total complaints of sudden acceleration for the Lexus and Camry in the 2002-04 model years averaged 132 a year. That's up from an average of 26 annually for the 1999-2001 models, the Times review found.

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

Here's another important piece of information about the auto companies. Ford took NO...ZERO "bailout" dollars from the government. Ford's profit of well over $2 billion triggered a profit-sharing bonus with its workers...mostly American union workers. These are the same union workers who are blamed when an American auto company's multi-million dollar executives make bad choices about which cars to make, and which components to use.

American union workers work hard! American union workers work efficiently! When the right decisions are made at the top, our work force can compete with anyone in the world. Having faith in America's work force is one of the pillars of American patriotism. So, wave your flags, and buy your Toyotas. My wife and I will wave our flags, too, but from our Ford Fusion and our Dodge Caravan!!

latimes.com/news/la-fi-toyota-pedal30-2010jan30,0,1303736.story
latimes.com
Doubt cast on Toyota's decision to blame sudden acceleration on gas pedal defect
The pedal maker denies that its products are at fault. Some independent safety experts also are skeptical of Toyota's explanations. 'We know this recall is a red herring,' one says.

By Ralph Vartabedian and Ken Bensinger

January 30, 2010

Toyota Motor Corp.'s decision to blame its widening sudden-acceleration problem on a gas pedal defect came under attack Friday, with the pedal manufacturer flatly denying that its products were at fault.

Federal vehicle safety records reviewed by The Times also cast doubt on Toyota's claims that sticky gas pedals were a significant factor in the growing reports of runaway vehicles. Of more than 2,000 motorist complaints of sudden acceleration in Toyota and Lexus vehicles over the last decade, just 5% blamed a sticking gas pedal, the analysis found.

What's more, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has conducted eight investigations into sudden-acceleration problems in Toyota vehicles over the last seven years, none of which identified a sticking pedal as a potential cause.

"The way the sudden-acceleration problems are occurring in reported incidents doesn't comport with how this sticky pedal is described," said Sean Kane, president of Safety Research & Strategies, a Rehoboth, Mass., auto safety consulting firm. "We know this recall is a red herring."

Sudden-acceleration events in Toyota and Lexus vehicles have been blamed for at least 19 fatalities and 815 vehicle crashes since 1999. (MORE)
http://www.latimes.com/news/la-fi-toyota-pedal30-2010jan30,0,4708338,ful...

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

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Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

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