Pay cut for pay raises

Here's an example of individual action backing up words, something that I believe Mr. Independent and Fred would agree with. Be nice if it became a trend among the elite salaried types.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-leadership/wp/2014/08/05/kentucky...

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It's a shame this post didn't generate more interest. The story is compelling and I find that important posts like this get little attention while nonsense gets all the attention. Makes me wonder about posters on SB.
Many of my threads that do not generate interest among the regulars on SB do end up going viral.

Statements made are the opinion of the writer who is exercising his first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and are generally permitted.

We're not interested in your posts is it? That's YOUR fault, for not more fully explaining to us just exactly who you think you are.

overcompensated. There are innumerable examples, but, again generally, the Japanese get it right. For example, the CEO of Toyota is getting a little over $2,000,000 currently. The CEO of General Motors is getting over $14,000,000. That's bad enough. But, if we take ALL executive compensation in American companies and slash them to the levels of those comparable positions in Japanese companies, think of what could be done with those extra billions of dollars! There could be some improvements in the pay and benefits for hard-working men and women in factories. Some of the money could be added to the budgets for research and development, which could drastically cut the costs associated with recalls of defective materials, and/or lawsuits from defective products. This would help the "bottom line."
Such a change in the culture of our giant corporations could actually help the "bottom line" in other ways as well. Workers who are compensated better, have more pride in their work, and have more validation for what they do. Such workers take less days off. Such workers are more loyal; more likely to stay at a particular company. This can slash the number of new workers who have to be trained when others leave for a job with a different company.
And, as far as overall executive compensation is concerned, they can and do receive stock options. If executives do well, the company increases revenues and net profit, the value of the stock will soar, and the executives will get their multi-millions in the form of capital gains, which are currently taxed at a lower rate than direct compensation anyway! It's a "win-win" proposition!

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