Perryman hits a homerun

Really interesting article from The Sojourner Truth weekly newspaper. Rev. Perryman hits the nail on the head when he wonders what happened to the black enclaves that used to exist, and wonders why no one is building them now.
Goes right to what I said the other day about the Great Society not fulfilling it's promises but instead actually hurting black communities. Amen brother.

Without question, African Americans as a whole have progressed and are better off today than during the early and mid-20th Century. However, these gains - successfully won only by a “marching, riding, sitting, and protesting community that was banded together” - came with a steep price.

Whereas black survival and liberation has always been connected to solidarity, the unintended consequences of our progress has been the loss of connectedness and responsibility to one another as well as the bifurcation of the community into separate groups.

I spoke about this troubling state of the black community with Professor Charles Ogletree, one of the nation’s leading experts on race and justice issues who also serves as the director of Harvard Law School’s Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice.

Perryman: Let’s talk about Toledo first of all. You have described Toledo as being the number one battleground in the nation. Could you elaborate?

Ogletree: Well, Ohio is a key state for whoever is going to be the next president and part of it is what I’ve read from the Toledo Blade and other places, that Mitt Romney and Barack Obama, both Harvard educated -- but both are having a hard time connecting with the folks in Toledo, particularly the working class poor. And, unfortunately, I assume that it's an environment where they can’t get jobs or careers as a lot of the work at Owens-Corning and other places has disappeared over the last 20 or 30 years.

So I think everybody understands that Ohio’s going to vote for who’s going to the best in terms of revitalizing their state and the cities around it. And that’s why I think the folks here have a lot to say and I hope will say it. It will make a difference.

Perryman: Let me jump off on that word “revitalize.” You’ve talked about today’s students and how you’ve been stressing to them a need to revitalize our communities and to do social justice in an indirect way. What did you mean by that?

Ogletree: That my students, unlike my graduation from law school in the late ‘70s, we didn’t have a choice of a job, we had a choice of several jobs. We could decide which part of the country, which city and what salary we wanted to take. That’s gone today because law firms are not hiring people at a relatively cheap rate to do all sorts of work anymore. They’re only hiring people that they think are going to be there permanently as partners.

So I’m trying to make students think about your skills are just as important and perhaps even more important working for a city, the state government or some kind of public interest entity or nonprofit. You can draft contracts, you know how to draft wills, you know how to deal with housing issues, and so there’s a need and a place for you in cities. And cities won’t survive without a strong set of laws about codes or about property and about businesses, etc. And so your talents can be used. That was the big thing I’m stressing to the students. And a lot of them say, “You know what, I think I will go back home and do some work,” and that to me is very encouraging.

Perryman: Coming back home is one of the problems that Toledo has suffered. Too many of our talented people leave Toledo to go to school or seek employment and just never come back.

Ogletree: Right. And that’s part of the challenge. What can you do to make them come back? You’ve got to have some real opportunities in Toledo for people to say that’s what I want to do and where I want to be. The woman at the breakfast was very honest in her comments saying “I worry about my son being around folks who are poor and especially black.”

And I assume that’s what is happening in the church as well, that you can see the frustration of people who feel locked into the environment they’re in and worried about their kids, and worried about the family, the house, meals, jobs and all that. And the whole thing is try to keep them involved in Toledo in some way and make them see that there’s something meaningful there to come back to.

Perryman: Some scholars have indicated that although desegregation was the initial goal of the civil rights movement, integration was what was actually achieved. The result being the loss of black businesses and professionals from the community as well as wide intra-racial disparities and gaps among blacks and blacks. Your thoughts?

Ogletree: Well, as I told you, I’ve seen it. It’s very disappointing in some respects. That folks see that what Brown v. Board of Education did is give them the opportunity to get outside the community and I understand that. But when they leave and take off it becomes a very unfortunate thing because they don’t come back.

I think we’ve got to figure out a way to -- churches, entrepreneurs, all of us - to say, “Let’s buy back our community,” because somebody’s going to buy it. And then it’s not going to be our community anymore and that’s going to be a big issue in terms of what’s going to be happening next.

So that’s the big challenge that we have to face and I don’t know how we’re going to do it but there’s not going to be anything easy. I don’t know if you see differently, but the question is what the lady said, “I’ve got to protect my son and move out to the suburbs or why can’t we have a black enclave right in the city.” And I had to challenge her. She obviously had good reasons but it was very chilling to hear that happen and try to figure out what folks are doing to keep folks in the community as opposed to leaving the community because they’re worried about what’s going on as opposed to trying to change it, which I think is what we need.

How do you make it a better community?

No votes yet

He became eremite and hasn't been the same since.

Toledo, is now officially Little Detroit, and it will only get much, much, worse in every category imaginable.

was very demeaning. Your Ghettoese just doesn't fly as being very sincere!

I don't see where this article relates to ANYTHING that you said about the "Great Society" a few days ago.

Twila, some days your ignorance is blinding.

Any statement I make is the opinion of me exercising my first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and is generally permitted.

it will allow all criminal loving, racist Liberals, to get a taste of what their " appeal", lacks and will never have.

A moral standing about what is right.

And ,what is sanguinary horrors committed by those who should have never been released to the World, once previously caught in similar heinous & purely evil crimes !

Taxpayers have infused uncountable sums of money into inner city "revitalization." Although it's difficult to project how much worse the inner city would be without these funds, it's obvious that it's not improving.

There's no amount of taxpayer handouts that can alter what really needs to be changed--the morals, culture, and values of the majority of people living in the inner city. If you have babies that you can't pay for, drink and take drugs, steal and kill, there's nothing that non-inner city people can do to help with that. People make neighborhoods--not money.

Take Nebraska Avenune in Toledo. When I was growing-up in the 60s and 70s, Nebraska Avenue was inhabited by Polish immigrants and children of immigrants. They kept their yards and houses neat and worked hard at their jobs. Now--if you're brave enough--drive the length of Nebraska starting at Byrne and take a look at the neighborhoods. What a disaster! Nothing that tax dollars can do to change that.

The one aspect of the Reverand's article that I wouldn't agree with is the statement "So I think everybody understands that Ohio’s going to vote for who’s going to be the best in terms of revitalizing their state and the cities around it." Nope--the inner city is going to vote for who is going to give them free stuff.

"Now--if you're brave enough--drive the length of Nebraska starting at Byrne and take a look at the neighborhoods. What a disaster! Nothing that tax dollars can do to change that."

I disagree. The City/State could take the land via emminent domain and give it to UT for expansion. Of course they won't because the City is intent on marginalizing the University and has for years.

I remember a party where fellow UT students who live in the vicinity of Parkside and Nebraska and the TPD/UTPD came because it was "too loud". In the process of TPD breaking up the party and arresting people under "Operation Binge Drinking" one of the residents of the home pointed out multiple drug deals that were going on in the home across the street at that moment. This particular student had also had his vehicle broken into several times by the frequenters of the crackhouse across the street.

MikeyA

I make deliveries all over Toledo. I have been the entire length of Nebraska avenue. What a rat hole. Boarded up houses, houses partially burnt.

"We're all riding on the Hindenburg, no sense fighting over the window seats"-Richard Jenni

Everytime I read something posted by four-sandwich- eating Fred, I want to go on a hunger strike.

So that means you're on one now then.

Any statement I make is the opinion of me exercising my first amendment right to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech in the United States is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and is generally permitted.

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