Teachers' salaries online . Look up your school district

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You may be surprised .
http://ohiocasb.org/
also,
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catch colgate!

this post will get even more hits that my Tricia wedding blast I think !

WOW! I thought Toledo teachers were underpaid. I am sure these salaries are base salaries and do not take into account the supplementals and other monetary perks, health care, cell phones, etc. John Foley $158.000 for a failing school district? Ohio schools are open 180 days, more or less, 61/2 hours a day minus the lunch break. So is that 45-60 dollars an hour? Good money for these economic times.

....administrators work well beyond the school hours, both before and after, and generally work through most of the summer as well, as well as attending lots of extracurricular meetings, events, etc. for the district. Just goes with the job, but the hours are much more than what you project.

(and I recognize teachers do, as well)

Although $158,000 may seem like a lot, it's worth noting that the TPS enterprise is like a $350,000,000 annual business. That is a LOT lower than you'd find for CEOs of business enterprises of that scale.

...a poor performer. I bet there are times the Superintendent of TPS would love to do that but knows he could never get away with it. The little darlins' need to be educated (whether they can do the work or not).

Old South End Broadway

...and don't mean to relate too much to a business, as they have vastly different goals. Great point! But sometimes we forget how big of an enterprise schooling is.

I have 2 acquaintances with the same years of teaching experience and both have Master's degrees. One teaches for Oregon schools, and the other for TPS. According to the link, the one who teaches for TPS makes $11,000 less than the one who teaches for Oregon schools.

I suppose "underpaid" depends on what you're using as a basis for comparison.

Very illuminating. Two reflections: A.)The khmer rouge purged Cambodia in 1975 take-over by slaughtering the local leaders: politicians, professionals, educators to install a "new order." B.) Toledo
recently had a Mayor who highly encouraged those who derived an income from the corporate limits of Toledo to reside in that city because to do otherwise was "Just Not Right." 60% + of those listed as District employees reside outside of Toledo. The conclusion to be drawn (after we thank heaven we are not in South East Asia) is that it is highly unfair to attack hard working people regardless of the motivation. We should begin to listen to individuals who possess insight on public affairs.

way out of touch with wages and salaries in the public sector. But by all means if Toledo teachers are underpaid as it seems they are, according to comments here, they should be fairly compensated. I have no problem with that, the salaries just seemed a little out of the norm to me. Guess I am wrong.

I say they need no more raises till the economy comes back

This is the state minimum for the number of school days that must be held. You should be aware that teachers work a lot more than this, including mandatory work days, parent-teacher conferences, and continuing education seminars. Then there is all the "unnoticed" work they do, like lecture prep and grading, much of which goes home with them. My wife, who teaches high school, often grades on the weekend because her "free" time at work winds up subbing for another teacher or some other in-school duty. And how about the number of times they stay after school or show up early to tutor a student? No extra pay for that, yet my wife probably does this 4-5 times a week.

And let's not forget that the state now mandates that teachers attain a Master's degree within ten years of getting their teacher's license - that's another $20,000 to $40,000 in tuition they have to pay out of pocket (unless they are lucky enough to work in a district with tuition reimbursement).

As for the summers: if you work in the field you know that these keep getting shorter. My wife's classes end in mid-June and start up in mid-August, but there are all sorts of meetings and mandatory functions between the end of one year and the beginning of another. Then there is the matter of course prep for the new classes that get assigned and the retooling of classes already taught - the best time to do that is in the summer, with the reduced workload. I estimate my wife works a minimum of 50 hours per week during the school year and 5-10 hours a week in the off weeks. That's a lot of work for a job that pays $38K a year and has at best average benefits.

But but but...it's for the children!

38k with benifits? And a pension?

For 9 months of work?

SWEET deal...and with your salery ?....you are doing better than most people in Ohio...

Oh poor poor mike....you guys make.... on guess.....what .. over 80k a year?

I support family of 5 on just over half that...many do it on less....

And you play the hardship card?

“Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.”

No one's playing the hardship card that I can see. At best these are mediocre wages. Given the levels of educational attainment and the hours worked, clearly our teachers are not doing it for the money.

Not all teachers are as conscientious as Mistress HistoryMike, HistoryMike, and you should be very keenly aware of that. However, since school teachers can't get merit raises and their job reviews (such as they are) are not public knowledge, and since the mere civilians are not allowed to monitor classes, just how would anyone know these things?

As far as I'm aware, there is no GPA requirement for a teaching certificate. Someone with a 'D' average can get the same certificate that everyone else gets, put in the same mandatory time for the same pay and benefits and retire with a decent pension and health care. Same vacation too.

Being required to obtain a masters degree isn't unreasonable, especially given the state of the public school system. Does the school system reimburse the tuition?

Mistress HistoryMike may work hard at her job, but I'll tell you something. She's employed and there are much harder jobs than trying to pound knowledge into the heads of a bunch of teenagers, and if neither of you like $38K allow me to remind you that there are plenty of people who don't make that much.

Mad Jack
Mad Jack's Shack

My point was to clarify that there is a lot more to the job of a teacher than the "they only work 180 days a year" comment. This is akin to "cops sit around and eat doughnuts all day" or "firemen sit on their asses until a call comes in" or "politicans run around naked all day in government gyms" or "programmers do the crossword all day until a problem occurs" kind of nonsense that gets put out by people who are not in one of those lines of work.

Are there people who make a lot less than $38K? Of course. Are there people who make more than $38K? You bet.

As far as grades: each college has its own standards, but most have some sort of baseline for graduating. AT UT you need the following just to get accepted into the College of Education (generally after the sophormore year of study):

An overall GPA of 2.5 or higher in general education
An overall GPA of 2.5 or higher in the major field
An overall GPA of 2.5 or higher in professional education courses

Students completing degree programs in teacher education have to attain a minimum overall higher education GPA of 2.7.

Re: lousy teachers - you will get no argument from me that there are some ineffective teachers in the system, and I agree that more could be done to weed out (or force to improve) teachers whose performance does not meet standards or produce desired results.

And fritz is right: most teachers could make more in the private sector, but they prefer the school or university environment. I would much rather teach than fasten door panels to a Jeep or grill hamburgers all day. That being said: I spent over a decade getting my BA, MA, and PhD, and along the way I did everything from wait tables to deliver pizzas to tend bar to sort packages to clean toilets in order to pay the bills. Perhaps in our analysis here some emphasis can also be placed in the equation of "the value of a teacher" on the financial sacrifices that are made in the attainment of and continuation in this career choice.

Oh, and BTW: my wife does not get a pension: she has a self-funded 403-B on which her employer kicks in 2 percent of contributions. Admittedly it's better than nothing, but there are many teachers whose benefits are similarly low.

From HistoryMikePhD: This is akin to "cops sit around and eat doughnuts all day" or "firemen sit on their asses until a call comes in" or "politicans run around naked all day in government gyms" or "programmers do the crossword all day until a problem occurs" kind of nonsense that gets put out by people who are not in one of those lines of work.

I can't speak for cops, politicians or firemen, but I'm a programmer/analyst by trade and I know for a fact that unless some crises occurs, programmers will surf the 'net and spend the rest of their time playing games. I know, see?

My point about $38K is that it's not a fortune, but it's better than $35K and it's a whole lot better than being unemployed. It's also not gut busting factory work on an assembly line, and it isn't working as a temp in an office full of hateful, abusive women and not being able to quit because the rent has to be paid this month. Teaching school is a good position. Let us not be too ungrateful here.

Getting right to the point, I firmly believe my dog Excellent Rachmaninoff could make a GPA of 2.5. Even I could make 2.5. Face it, 2.5 isn't all that hard to hit unless the professors are absolute fiends and the exams are unreasonable. Even then I'll bet most people could do it. I'll even bet McCaskey could do it. If you are trying for something close to excellence, set the bar at 3.3 or so.

From HistoryMike and Fritz: And fritz is right: most teachers could make more in the private sector, but they prefer the school or university environment.

Close, but no cigar. Most good teachers could make more money in the private sector. The majority of the school teachers I had at good old Sylvania High School were just this side of hard core unemployable. They wouldn't have lasted ten minutes in the real world, but they were supposed to be giving us an education. What a joke that was. With the economy as crappy as it is and unemployment in the solid double digits, it well and truly would be the good to excellent teachers who could land a job in the private sector. The rest can return to the school system.

Of course, if you work in the private sector you won't get the vacation and benefits the school system gives you. You may be right about vacation not being what it used to be, or what most people think it is, but it's still a whole lot more than the ten days most office staff gets. Health benefits count for quite a bit as well.

Your wife deserves a better pension. Two percent is more of an insult than a contribution.

Mad Jack
Mad Jack's Shack

about 2.8 or 2.9 for me, while, I fully admit, putting somewhat less than complete effort into it.

'The majority of the school teachers I had at good old Sylvania High School were just this side of hard core unemployable. They wouldn't have lasted ten minutes in the real world'

Conversely, most people in the 'real world' wouldn't last ten minutes in the classroom, especially trying to educate the likes of you...or me.

From McCaskey: Conversely, most people in the 'real world' wouldn't last ten minutes in the classroom, especially trying to educate the likes of you...or me.

This should be recorded as one of the great truisms of SwampBubbles. Especially given the current law about corporal punishment, child abuse, political correctness and various freedoms observed in the classroom.

Mad Jack
Mad Jack's Shack

were that I thought teachers made a good salary accordng to the website, http://ohiocasb.org/. Then I backtracked when I felt that I may have been out of touch with teacher's wages. Now I need to back track again. Posters are using $35-38,000 as a teachers salary. Did anyone look at the website? Salaries are posted according to name or district and name of teacher.

In Toledo/TPS there are very few teachers with a salary as low as $35-$38,000. For instance: Teacher at Gunckle/Jones for 32 years $69,397. Teacher at Deveaux for 11 years $59,732. Teacher at Scott for 7 years $43,738. Teacher at Marshall for 5 years $35,825.

I am back with my original thoughts, this is good money for 180 days and 61/2 hours a day, not including fringe benefits, I don't care how many papers you grade at home!

and it isn't working as a temp in an office full of hateful, abusive women and not being able to quit because the rent has to be paid this month

LMAO! That is too funny, true but funny, been there myself.

Thanks tm. You too, huh?

I've both been there and watched others in the same place.

I once had a co-worker with whom I became fairly good friends. In truth I liked his dog Sammy better than him, but he, being a dog person, easily understood my position and accepted it. Anyway, Sammy's Owner (SO) stormed into my cubical one morning and declared that he had decided to beat the living shit out of our boss - who often behaved like a real jerk and was abusive to his employees. Knowing that the rent had to be payed and Sammy fed, I talked him out of it.

Some months later the boss (AH) hired a new clerk. She was a slender, attractive red head, twice divorced with teenage children at home. One ex was in the slammer and the other had fled across the State line. She was what I would call a real hard case divorcee. And so, you see, when AH decided to read her the royal riot act over a trivial error, Red blew a fuse. She loudly informed AH that this conversation would take place in his office with the door closed. Red followed AH into his office and slammed the door hard enough to about take it off the hinges. She then delivered a tirade worthy of any enraged longshoreman and finished with a promise to rearrange AH's wedding tackle if he ever tried anything like that again. Red exited with another door slam louder than the first. AH stayed in his office the rest of the day.

Mad Jack
Mad Jack's Shack

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