Report: Great Lakes water levels dropping

Great Lakes water levels could drop by up to two feet by the turn of the century as temperatures rise, according to a recent series of reports released by the Union of Concerned Scientists.

The water decline is a response to global climate change, according to the report by the group of scientists and citizens that advocates for science-based solutions to environmental problems. Warming temperatures reduce ice cover and increase evaporation. Lake Huron and Lake Michigan are projected to have the greatest changes. (cont.)

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yes yes...Global warming is also causing it to get colder...

http://www.isws.illinois.edu/hilites/press/090804reccold.asp

Illinois State Water Survey - Midwest Sets Record Cold Temperatures in July, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Institute of Natural Resource Sustainability University of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignINRS State Scientific Surveys
Illinois Natural History Survey Illinois State Geological Survey Illinois State Water Survey Illinois Sustainable Technology Center
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ISWS Press Release
For Immediate Release August 4, 2009
Midwest Sets Record Cold Temperatures in July Sources:

Contact: Mike Timlin (217) 333-8506, mtimlin@illinois.edu
Steve Hilberg (217 333-8495, hberg@illinois.edu

Lisa Sheppard - (217) 244-7270, sheppard@illinois.edu

This was the coldest July on record for the nine-state Midwest region, based on preliminary temperature data. The average temperature for the region was 68.0 degrees, 4.7 degrees below normal. The previous record was 68.9 degrees in 1992, according to Mike Timlin, Regional Climatologist with the NOAA Midwestern Regional Climate Center (http://mrcc.isws.illinois.edu).

It was the coldest July on record for Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa; the second coldest on record for Michigan, Kentucky, Ohio, and Wisconsin; the third coldest in Minnesota; and the fourth coldest on record for Missouri. Records for the region date back 114 years.

Timlin says that more than 400 record low minimum temperatures and 1,300 record low maximum temperatures (lowest high temperature) were set during July across the nine-state region.

"Temperatures were below normal for most of July with two particularly cold periods. The first was July 1-9, and the second was July 17-23," states Timlin.

There were 370 record low maximum temperatures set during the period July 1-9, and 23 record low minimum temperatures. Temperatures ranged from 2 degrees below normal in southern Missouri to as much as 8 degrees below normal in the Michigan Upper Peninsula.

During the period from July 17 to 23, temperatures were 10 to 12 degrees below normal across Iowa, Missouri, much of Illinois, southern Indiana, and western Kentucky, and 6 to 9 degrees below normal across the remainder of the region. A total of 942 record low maximum temperatures and 337 record low minimum temperatures were established over this seven-day period.

Many locations in the central Midwest did not reach 90 degrees at all during the month. Typically, the number of days with temperatures reaching 90 degrees or above ranges from 10 to 15 from southern Missouri eastward through Kentucky, and three to five in the northern third of the region.

Louisville, KY normally has about 12 days of temperatures 90 degrees or above in July, and recorded none this July. St. Louis, MO normally experiences 16 days with temperatures 90 degrees or above, and recorded only four in July.

International Falls, MN did not report a single day 80 degrees or higher, and experienced its coldest July on record with an average temperature of 58.8 degrees, breaking the old record of 59.4 degrees set in 1992.

Other locations in the Midwest that had a record cold July include Madison, WI - average temperature of 65.7 degrees, old record 66.7 degrees in 1891; Grand Rapids, MI – average temperature 67.1 degrees, old record 67.2 degrees in 1992; Cedar Rapids, IA – average temperature 66.2 degrees, old record 69.9 degrees in 2004; Rockford, IL – average temperature 67.0 degrees, old record 69.0 degrees in 1915; South Bend, IN – average temperature 68.3 degrees, old record 68.5 degrees in 1996; Cincinnati, OH – average temperature 70.1 degrees, old record 70.7 degrees in 1947; and Frankfort, KY – average temperature 71.5 degrees, old record 75.2 degrees in 1947. In Missouri, Columbia recorded its second coldest July on record with an average temperature of 72.3 degrees. The record is 72.2 degrees in 1924.

July precipitation was normal to above normal from southwestern Minnesota to southern Ohio and eastern Kentucky. Rainfall was less than 50 percent of normal from south-central Minnesota across much of Wisconsin. Parts of central Minnesota, much of the northern half of Wisconsin, and the western half of the Michigan Upper Peninsula remained in moderate to severe drought at the end of the month, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor.

The Midwestern Regional Climate Center is a program funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and is located in the Division of Illinois State Water Survey in the Institute of Natural Resource Sustainability at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

“Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.”

You don't even understand the difference between climate and local weather, do you? Study up and then get back to me.

Pink Slip

How about telling us what the weather will be like next Monday? As precisely as the global warming crowd is with their predictions. It should be childs' play.

How about telling us what the weather will be like next Monday?

See my comment regarding climate vs. local weather

Pink Slip

Pink, you’re talking to anti- intellectuals who pride themselves in ignorance and lack of scientific knowledge and understanding.

How about you? Can you tell me exactly, as someone like yourself, or ALGORE would--what kind of weather we're going to have Monday next?

Antidotal evidence of what the weather did yesterday, is doing today or is going to do tomorrow is not proof or disproof climate change/global warming. The fact that you don’t know the difference is absolutely mind boggling.

For the love of god, go back to college and take a few remedial science classes.

Yes yes...I allways expect global warming to cause low temp records...

So the whole globe is warming...except for the midwest.....

uh ...yeah sure...

Face it...you are in a cult and the victim of a hoax.

“Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.”

That is an entire misunderstanding of global weather patterns. Northwestern europe, for example, would most likely experience more extreme cold weather effects, as the warm--water gulf stream current that helps moderate their weather shifts paths.

(1) Regional (2) short-term data do not provide a basis for refuting the mountains of data that support global climate change. It'd be like declaring in the middle of January that winter is over because of an unusually warm day.

Ah...so global warming means only part of the globe warms...while other parts get colder...

And record cold temps mean nothing...

Oh..BTW...researchers recently discovered that trees contribute to global warming:

http://www.ecofriendlymag.com/sustainable-transporation-and-alternative-...

More than man in fact:

Quote:

"Emissions of nonmethane hydrocarbon compounds to the atmosphere from the biosphere exceed those from anthropogenic activity."

(For pink "biosphere" means trees and plants...and anthropogenic activity means "activity of man")

“Political correctness is a doctrine, fostered by a delusional, illogical minority, and rabidly promoted by an unscrupulous mainstream media, which holds forth the proposition that it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.”

Moron. Do you even read what you link to? Quote from YOUR article:

If you mix emissions from the city with emissions from plants, they interact to alter the chemistry of the atmosphere. There is much more isoprene emitted to the atmosphere than all of the gases (gasoline, industrial chemicals) emitted by human activities, with the important exceptions of methane and carbon dioxide.
—Prof. Paul Wennberg, Caltech, project leader

And yes, it can get colder in some places as the Earth as a whole warms up. Pick up a book someone...

Pink Slip

"If you mix emissions from the city with emissions from plants, they interact to alter the chemistry of the atmosphere."

Is that what you are saying? That trees are to blame for "Global Warming"?

 

Don't blame me,
I didn't vote for a
socialist.

There's a city full of walls you can post complaints at

How much longer will it be before we're all cooking on open fires, and life as we know it, comes to an end? I have some emergency gear that I can't wait to try out!

...

this is of particular concern to my mom-in-law who has been watching lake levels for decades. She's concerned that for many years the lake levels have been artificially increased (by numerous means, including dams and weirs) in order to benefit shipping and hydroelectric plants on the lakes. Historical International Joint Commission reports about the levels show unusually high levels in the 1970s (when we saw much of the flooding in this area) to 1980s but lower levels over the past couple of years with the lowest levels in the 1960s.

Here is an easy-to-read publication from the IJC about lake levels. http://pub.iugls.org/en/Facts%20Sheets/IUGLS%20Fact%20Sheet%204_web.pdf

Note that they say lake levels "fluctuate in response to changes in the climate of the region."

In the big picture, it's damaging to all sides of the issue to think that a single factor like a lake level, which has many factors that influence it, is proof of anything on a global basis - and that applies to global warming 'believers' and 'deniers' alike.

(on the plus side, if lake levels drop by 2 feet, we'll have more beaches for people to enjoy ... on the minus side, we'll have less shipping and commerce and more expense for dredgings....)

"In the big picture, it's damaging to all sides of the issue to think that a single factor like a lake level, which has many factors that influence it, is proof of anything on a global basis - and that applies to global warming 'believers' and 'deniers' alike."

I agree wholeheartedly. But I don't think the article implies that. Perhaps the subsequent back & forth comments derailed the subject at hand. But I think it's interesting to point out some regional consequences of climate change, especially considering the misunderstanding of local weather vs climate.

Pink Slip

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