Srickland lays out new education standards in speech

It was a big speech. He upped state share of funding to 60%, said he will close failing schools, give greater power to fire under-performing teachers. OGT is scrapped, high schoolers must take ACT instead. More state oversight, new teachers will do 4 year residency program. More cuts in other parts of state budget.
http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/index.html

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But...he didn't raise it to 60%, he said, in the two year budget, even in the current economic situation, it will take the state’s share of the funding to 55% and it will grow to a 59% funding as a part of his educational plan which will take 8 years.

I watched the speech on Ohio Channel...and while the audio kept fading out? That part was clear. I just checked the transcript on the Dispatch site:

And, we will strengthen the historic partnership between the state and our local school districts. When I came into office, local school districts paid for the majority of school costs. In the upcoming two-year budget, even with grave economic challenges facing Ohio and the nation, my plan will take the state's share of education funding to 55 percent. As our Ohio evidence-based plan is fully phased in, the state's share will grow to an unprecedented 59 percent.

We don't remember days only moments...

a brilliant Republican sponsored law, allowing children , who attend " in crisis schools', (nearly all of Toledos-BIG TIME ! ), to attend schools of their choice, all paid for by the State of Ohio !! If your middle school is in crisis,parents can choose to send them ANYWHERE, in the district ...private , parochial, or even public,if you are that stupid ,at NO COST ! It also applies to high school kids. T.P.S., teachers HATE , this law.Unions, HATE, this law !! Parents and the better schools (parochial and private ) LOVE, this law !! Free choice...something Dims' HATE...except , of course, you are a BABY !!

Strickland said, "Ohio's current graduation test does not measure creativity, problem solving, and other key skills. We will make our assessments both relevant and rigorous by replacing the Ohio Graduation Test with the ACT and three additional measures.

All students will take the ACT college entrance examination, not only to measure their high school achievement, but to help raise students' aspirations for higher education. Students will also take statewide 'end of course' exams, complete a service learning project, and submit a senior project.

These four measures will give our graduating high school seniors the opportunity to demonstrate knowledge, creativity, and problem solving skills, in short, to demonstrate precisely the skills that will help them succeed in life."

This is more in keeping with what the private high schools are doing to prepare high-school students for college.--they are college-prep schools. You can't skate through with a General Diploma.

It is about time that the public schools began thinking in terms of college , community service and senior projects. (I know that some public-school students DO acheive much, participate in service learning, and complete senior career projects...but everyone is required to do this in a private school).

Now the aim of acceptable ACT scores will have to be met with curricular changes that raise the bar in the classroom. This will -be where the real changes have to come in.

Just as with the OGT, which is a frighteningly simple test that many cannot pass, students must be prepared to do WELL on the ACT.

From Helen Wheales: Now the aim of acceptable ACT scores will have to be met with curricular changes that raise the bar in the classroom. This will -be where the real changes have to come in.

Just as with the OGT, which is a frighteningly simple test that many cannot pass, students must be prepared to do WELL on the ACT.

I understand your point, however this solution will very likely fail to remedy the real problem. The idea of using ACT tests in place of some other exam created by the State is laudable, unless the real goal of the exam is to obfuscate a problem that cannot be solved, which is what I believe to be the case. Consider that you, like many people, cannot or will not conceive of a high school where the students don't care about their ACT score. In fact, their own ACT score means nothing to them. The teachers in this school have the same attitude, to one degree or another. These are the schools that need to be changed. The other schools wouldn't care if the ACT is used or not, as students are likely to take the ACT anyway and doing well on it is very important to them (both students and teachers).

How is switching from one test to another, probably harder test going to remedy the situation of students who don't care if they learn anything or not, and teachers who don't care if the students learn, and administrators who either don't care or are powerless to effect a change?

The answer is obvious: it won't. While switching to the ACT is a good idea, it won't solve the problems that plague Ohio schools. It isn't going to miraculously change a school rated as being in academic emergency into a place of academic excellence.

As a case in point, the Volstead Act didn't cure alcohol abuse. Traffic laws haven't stopped people from running red lights or speeding. Increased penalties and 'safety checkpoints' haven't stopped people from driving drunk. Gun control hasn't stopped violent crime, and in fact cities with the strictest gun laws have the highest rates of violent crime.

One remark that did give me cause for hope is, But even for teachers already in the field, we must have the ability to remove them from the classroom if their students are not learning. Right now, it's harder to dismiss a teacher than any other public employee. Under my plan, we will give administrators the power to dismiss teachers for good cause, the same standard applied to other public employees.

This will lead to the inevitable howling about unfair practices, age and racial discrimination. If this is actually implemented the next few years will be a right lively time.

Mad Jack
Mad Jack's Shack

I am afraid that you are right. I spoke way too soon...without thinking about this. Good points.

Sure, we can give kids the Harvard entrance essay, and try to prepare them for it, but if they don't want to learn, don't see the value in learning, have seemingly more important or more distracting things going on in their lives, they aren't going to excel at the essay...who says they'd even try?

I know that a lot of kids in failing public high schools didn't care about their OGT scores, or only did because it meant that they got their diploma.

When I considered the necessary curriculum changes and raising the bar, I was obviously idealizing.

After thinking baout your post, I wonder how many more kids will be discouraged from attending college, much less finishing high school, because of difficulty with the ACT test. How many school swill start teaching the test ?(Kaplan and all the other test-prep services teach the test and give hints and tips for passing...this means the kids with the dough to spare on test prep will have the advantage....as they do now).

...concern. "Fifth, under my plan, we will establish an unprecedented level of school district accountability and transparency."

"School districts will undergo performance audits overseen by the Department of Education to make sure they are maintaining the academic and operating standards we've established."

"Districts will report their spending plans before each school year and then account for every dollar at the conclusion of the school year."

"And just as we provide an academic report card for our schools, we will provide parents, public officials, and taxpayers an annual fiscal and operational report card for every school district. That means that when we send districts funding to help students who need additional attention and instruction, we will now be able to track our dollars to see that they directly reach those students."

"Failure to comply with our standards will result, first, in the assigning of technical assistance to help a school district correct its deficiencies. If the problem persists, a district will be required to present a comprehensive plan outlining how it will reach full compliance with our academic and operating standards. Continued failure would result in the district being placed in receivership, with entirely new leadership installed. And finally, if the district remains non-compliant, the State Board of Education would be required to revoke the school district's charter."

"In short, if a school district fails, we will shut it down.",
http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/01/28/stric...

Perhaps the Governor is being too lenient with failing school districts. And I have to wonder how much it will cost the state to take over failing school districts. Perhaps this is the stick to get the teachers to go after students who do not give a damn about academics.

Old South End Broadway

In short, if a school district fails, we will shut it down

After how many years? Rome is burning now. Right now. The fire is not confined to Toledo. Governor Strickland talks about what he'll do once he finds a fire. But let's suppose he finds the fire. Ultimately, he promises to shut the place down if (when - this is Ohio) the school fails to conform. What do you suppose he'll do with the students?

Governor Strickland talks about school funding and fails to mention that Toledo is spending $11,000 per student in schools that are in academic emergency. Now, to my way of thinking, this would indicate that the problem of educating students is not going to be solved by throwing money at it.

The governor finishes with a cliche about nature and religion: Many years ago a pastor asked his congregation, "Do you know why geese fly in a V instead of side by side?" And then he explained, they fly in a V because it allows each goose to reduce the wind resistance for the bird flying behind it.

He concludes, My friends, surely we are as smart as the goose.

Don't count on it, Ted. These aren't geese, they're sky rats - pigeons. They can't decide which way they want to fly until food is discovered, at which point every single sky rat in the pack strives to be in the lead.

Mad Jack
Mad Jack's Shack

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