Free ride at Owens - limited to Woodward - WHY????

Why do Woodward students get a free ride at Owens & other school's students do not?

Free ride at Owens offered to some teens
Program is limited at first to Woodward

College debt is no longer as big a worry for some Woodward High School students. Paying back loans isn’t a factor when you can get a degree for free.
Owens Community College yesterday announced a program through which the college’s foundation will pick up the tab for Woodward seniors for whatever federal grants don’t cover.
“We know that college is expensive,” Owens President Christa Adams told the seniors gathered in the high school’s auditorium. “If your tuition is more than your financial aid at Owens next year, the Owens Foundation is announcing the Owens Success Program, which is scholarships to cover that difference for you.”
A NO-LOAN DEGREE
• The program is open only to Woodward seniors who graduate. Owens officials hope to expand the program to other Toledo Public Schools.
• Students must fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and be declared eligible for some financial aid. The Owens Foundation will make up the difference between the aid and the cost of tuition, which is nearly $3,000 a year.
• Students must enroll at Owens by July 1 for 12 or
more credit hours for the fall semester.
• Students must remain fulltime at Owens and pass their classes.

Woodward students have to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, known as the FAFSA. As long as they qualify for some state and federal grant funding, the Owens Foundation will pay for the rest.

Even if a student only gets the minimum Pell Grant of about $200 a semester, the Owens Foundation will pay for the remainder of the nearly $3,000 in annual tuition and fees at the college.

“I didn’t know if I wanted to go or not because I didn’t know if I could afford it,” Woodward senior Ashley Frost, 18, said. “This is great.”

Ms. Frost said she’s likely to take up Owens on its offer. She would like to become a social worker.

Ms. Frost and two of her classmates, Dorian Smith, 16, and Noah Davis, 18, received Owens sweatshirts during a drawing at yesterday’s event, which also included a performance by the new Owens Express dance team.

For now, the Success Program is only for Woodward students.

In its pilot stage, Owens wanted to focus on one school with students who would benefit from the program.

Also, Owens has a relationship with Woodward as partners in the GEAR UP college prep program.

To be eligible for the Success Program, a student has to be a Woodward graduate and enroll by July 1 for 12 or more credit hours at Owens for the fall semester.

Once at Owens, the student will have to remain full time and pass his or her classes.

If the student completes an associate’s degree within three years, he or she will graduate without having to repay any student loans.

“What better deal can there be?” Toledo Public Schools Superintendent John Foley said.
In the 2005-2006 school year, the most recent year for which data is available, 93.6 percent of Woodward seniors graduated.
Woodward Principal Emilio Ramirez said of the about 150 students who graduate each year, fewer than 20 percent pursue higher education.
If cost is the reason why they don’t go to college, the Owens program will give them that opportunity, Betsy Johnson, Owens’ director of financial aid, said.

And if a Woodward student wants to get a bachelor’s degree, the student still can make good use of the Success Program by taking the first two years at Owens, transferring to a university, and only worrying about paying for the last two years there, Ms. Johnson said.
That’s what Dorian Smith said he plans to do.
He’d like to study business at the University of Toledo or Bowling Green State University, but getting the first two years out of the way for free is hard to pass up, he said.
“It’s really a good thing for the school to step up to help like that,” Dorian said while wearing his new, red Owens sweatshirt.

The Owens Foundation has about $112,000 in grant and other money raised to fund this program, which officials anticipate will be enough for the 2008 Woodward class, said Ann Savage, president and chief executive officer of the Owens Foundation.
The foundation hopes to grow the program so it can be expanded to other Toledo Public Schools, Ms. Savage said.
Ohio Fire Marshal Michael Bell, a Woodward graduate, told students yesterday to take advantage of the opportunity of “enormous value” being offered to them through the program.
The former Toledo fire chief said he wouldn’t be where he is today if he hadn’t gotten a scholarship to attend UT.
“The next step in your life is the most important step in your life — getting an education that allows you to compete,” Mr. Bell said.

http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080208/NEWS21/75...

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And because the Owens Foundation in providing the funding.

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"Show me a man who lives alone and has a perpetually dirty kitchen, and
five times out of nine I'll show you an exceptional man." -Charles
Bukowski

There's a city full of walls you can post complaints at

I would think that kids in other high schools, who also can't afford college wouldn't be too happy about this. I want to know, why Woodward? Did they put all the schools names in a hat & have an honest draw to see which would be the pilot program? Are kids at Woodward more needy of the help than at other schools? (I doubt it.) I would bet that there are other, more schools with needier kids than at Woodward.

In its pilot stage, Owens wanted to focus on one school with students who would benefit from the program.

So I guess Owens has determined that students of other Public High Schools wouldn't benefit from the program? I have a niece who attends Start. They are not wealthy and she would defidently benefit a program like this. Should she transfer out-of-district just to qualify?

If man has no tea in him, he is incapable of understanding truth. ~Japanese Proverb

Surely you jest, Agent Starling.

One thing that has taken me all my life to learn is; This is NOT an honest town. I suggest that you read 'Unholy Toledo'.
Some people can tell this town stinks immediately upon arrival, but others it takes awhile.

And as far as election rigging, there is no need to rig in this town: They do as they damn well please, despite the election results.

For example; In 1989 there was an election issue that dealt with closing or keeping the Toledo House of Correction open. It was the clear intent of the voters that they wanted to keep it open and refurbish it. We voted to keep it open. It was closed shortly thereafter. (The same old song and dance - 'We know better than you voters do')

Remember the vote to ' Keep the Arena on the east side" ? Clearly, the voters wanted it to stay on the east side. But thru some mumbo jumbo and a power-play by the powers that be, it is on the east side all right - the east side of Huron street. ('We know better than you voters do').

These are just two examples of political hanky-panky that I will give to make my point before I barf ... - ' If you are looking for honest leadership in a town called Toledo, you'd better be going to Spain'.

Remember the vote to ' Keep the Arena on the east side" ? Clearly, the voters wanted it to stay on the east side. But thru some mumbo jumbo and a power-play by the powers that be, it is on the east side all right - the east side of Huron street. ('We know better than you voters do').

I clearly remember this vote on 9/11/01. I read the ballot issue and was never under the impression that it was a commitment to build on the East Side. For those who feel deceived due to the "mumbo jumbo". I can only say research the ballot language more carefully. If they had they wouldn't be having this argument now. ..and Issue 5 may not have passed also..

If man has no tea in him, he is incapable of understanding truth. ~Japanese Proverb

Should we have a 'do-over' on the Arena vote ?

I'm just wondering, since I wasn't a resident of Toledo back then (boy, what a great time that was!!)- what was the arena vote for then, if not to commit to building on the east side? Why would something be put on the ballot if it served no purpose?

Listed below are excerpts given to this very same topic on the Old Toledo Talk back in 2006.

SherryET said... People want to blame 9/11 for the confusion over what the intent was on the ballot and I say BS.

KraZyKat said...It quite possible that the presentation led voters to believe they were voting for an East Side Arena. posted by KraZyKat at 12:21 A.M. EST on Tue Mar 21, 2006

 

 SherryET stated... It's not quite possible, it is exactly the way it was written on the ballot. The voters knew what they were voting for and they approved it.

 

One more time here is the official Amendment as approved by voters on September 11, 2001

Section 79. Compulsory referendum of certain measures - franchises. No ordinance or resolution for a public improvement requiring or authorizing the expenditure of more than fifteen percent (15%) of the average gross annual current operating expenditures by the City for the five (5) fiscal years immediately preceding, or for the granting of a general public utility franchise, shall be effective until the same shall be approved by a majority vote of the electors voting thereon; provided, however, no convention center, exhibit hall, sports arena, or municipal theater, other than a sports arena located in the City's Marina District, being the area bounded by the Maumee River, Interstate Highway 280, Front Street and Main Street, shall be constructed, acquired, or leased unless the ordinance or resolution authorizing construction bidding, acquisition, or leasing shall have been approved by a majority vote of the electors voting thereon, whether or not such ordinance or resolution requires or authorizes the expenditure of more or less than fifteen percent (15%) of the average gross annual current operating expenditures by the City for the five (5) fiscal years immediately preceding. A general public utility is one in which all the people of the City may have an interest. (Amended by electors 9-11-01)

As read, The city cannot authorizes the expenditure of more or less than fifteen percent (15%) of the average gross annual current operating expenditures by the City for the five (5) fiscal years immediately preceding without going to the voters. It does not limit the construction of the Arena to the East Side for 5 years. While it does state "other than a sports arena located in the City's Marina District, being the area bounded by the Maumee River, Interstate Highway 280, Front Street and Main Street, this is not a firm commitment to build a Sports Arena on the East Side, rather it states, that the city can authorize the expenditures for infrastructure and other items (but not direct support for construction) to build it there without additional approval by a majority vote of the electors voting thereon.

So you can interpet this any way you wish, but for me I don't see where the amendment guarenteed that an Arena would be built in the Marina district. Instead, it says that if the city wished to build the arena anyplace else but the Marina District, it would simply have to go back to the voters to authorize spending of the money to be used for such.

If man has no tea in him, he is incapable of understanding truth. ~Japanese Proverb

done with the Arena/Marina issue. It's time to quit digressing and get back on topic here.

If man has no tea in him, he is incapable of understanding truth. ~Japanese Proverb

Kat, few voters can actually digest all the legaldee dah that is contained in that document that was placed on the ballot. Years later, it is used as a point of reference by the powers that be to say, 'see, it's right here, you voted on it...',

What they fail to include is the fact that at that point in time, this issue was presented to the community as basically a 'Keep the Arena on the east side' issue. Either you were for it, or you were not. A quick read thru all of the legal language confuses most non-legal type people, so they scan thru the confusing parts to what they understood: the description of the parameters of the proposed arena area. Maumee River, I-280, Front and Main. Clearly east side, so that gets a yes vote.

Based on that description, I believe most voters voted yes to keep the arena on the east side of Toledo.

After the dust settled, though, Gerkin and his gang of
opportunists 'knew better' than the voters. They decided that the supposed synergy created by clustering the arena with the failing bars and restaurants on the west side of the river would save the failing downtown redevelopment.

The voters - what do they know ?

el mahico - No, I realize Toledo is not an honest town. But then, few towns, states or countries are. (Italy's govt. is horribly crooked, by comparison though). Our country is perhaps less crooked & honest than some, but not by much. I guess Owens can do whatever it chooses to do - it just seems to be unfair to other schools. I wonder if UT made a similar offer for only students at Whitmer, or Waite - would there be more of an outcry? I do have the book "Unholy Toledo" - great book.

Well if Owens doesn't think that students from the other schools are good enough for their program then maybe the students at the other schools should look into other schools.

What's the big deal? It's a pilot program...someone has to go first. They picked someone to go first, who cares why. If it works out well then they can move on to other schools.

This was a no win for them. Any high school they picked with have every other school bitching and moaning about not getting selected.

Then why couldn't Owens have made an offer like this to all high school students that met specific requirements (attendance, gpa, disciplinary)? Some schools in other town are paying students to attend school ("$110. per subject or semester or something like that) just to BE there (which is absurd). - paying the students to go to school. So why not reward those students who actually do the work & make the effort? Rather than a generic offer to only Woodward students who graduate?

el mahico - you're correct about understanding the legalese on the ballots. The same can be said for Issue 5.

That would have been a much fairer way of doing it because we're kidding ourselves if we really think at any point Owens will be allowing graduates from all the schools in town to attend for free.
While I can't say for sure, I'm fairly certain that a huge portion of their cashflow comes from local grads so I really doubt that they're going to cut off that totally.

starling - I wonder if perhaps they identified a school that tended to currently send a low number of new grads to Owens?

(Note - I have absolutely no idea how they made the selection or what the rates of enrollment by high school are at Owens. I'm just trying to speculate on factors that might have been taken into consideration when they were selecting the school for this pilot programs.)

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