How Do You Feel About Public Education

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Is it time to consider the end of mandatory public education? Have the citizens of Ohio grown so distrusting of their school boards, and school administrators that they are ready to chuck it all, and take on more responsibility for their kids

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One of the things that gets me about

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When I talked about

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We know there are

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This subject seems to be fertile ground for my thoughts. What would happen to teachers in such an environment? Let

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Quality neighborhood schools would work for me. Any child should be able to walk to school and get a good education. And parents should be able to be involved in their children's education at the neighborhood school.

My neighborhood schools have been in academic emergency or academic watch for years. My children would have had or would go to Glenwood, Robinson and then Scott. Instead I have sent or taken them to St. Ann's and then Notre Dame Academy for my oldest child.

When I adopted three children and got legal custody of two more my quest for a quality education began.

My kids in the last ten years have gone to Fulton,Cherry, Glenwood, Harvard, McKinley, Grove Patterson, Elmhurst,DeVeaux, Scott, Toledo Village Shule, Monroe Academy, Academy of Business and Technology and Back to Basic's Home School. None of these public schools encouraged parents working in partnership with them. The Charter Schools encourage, enjoyed and wanted parents help in the classroom or wherever help was needed.

I have worn out vehicles transporting children to school and from school, not to mention time, energy and patience.

Now I homeschool my last two children on my dime and pay taxes to educate other people's children, pay teacher's and administrator's salaries, build schools and get called names by these same people.

If I had to do it all over again I would not have ever sent my children to a public school.

I would now encourage inner city parents to stay and fight for their neighbothood school to become quality schools, schools that would encourage their participation, that their children could walk to.

I am told that Arlington has 90% of their student walking to school. That's what I want to see in my neighborhood.

The

Purnhrt:

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I like your idea of letting the marketplace set the standard of what works. What we have now is not working. The public school system seems to be a self-perpetuating organism that lives only to keep on living.

I understand the reality, but is there a rule that says you can't have a nice neighborhood and a nice school in an area of lower priced homes?
I never wanted my kids to go to school with riff-raff, but to me the measure of riff-raff wasn't a matter of race or income levels. I don't want my kids' school to be held back by people that don't appreciate the value of an education.
Especially for the younger kids, the social part of the education will happen a lot easier if they don't have to take a bus to play with their friends outside of school.
For my convenience and my property value, my first choice would be to fight to keep a good school in my own neighborhood.

I understand the reality, but is there a rule that says you can't have a nice neighborhood and a nice school in an area of lower priced homes?
I never wanted my kids to go to school with riff-raff, but to me the measure of riff-raff wasn't a matter of race or income levels. I don't want my kids' school to be held back by people that don't appreciate the value of an education.
Especially for the younger kids, the social part of the education will happen a lot easier if they don't have to take a bus to play with their friends outside of school.
For my convenience and my property value, my first choice would be to fight to keep a good school in my own neighborhood.

I can foresee a futuristic novel being written where a "free-market style" educational system is put in place. With a free-market education, a few very large successful (monetarily) schools swallow up the competition so that eventually all of our kids are going to schools owned by Rupurt Murdoch (or a reasonable futuristic facsimile). All kids are thought to think and feel the same way. Kids' thoughts controlled by oligarchy-styled schools, and adults' thoughts controlled by oligarchy-style media.

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It's true a huge majority of students walk to Arlington, or live close enough they could walk. Yet after the end of this school year the school will be closed, torn down with all of the students currently within walking distance bused to the old Burroughs elementary until they are done with the construction of the new Arlington. There is not enough land to do what they have done in some other locations and build the new school while the old school building was still in use.

I understand the whole desire for a new school and anyone who has had to walk the number of stairs necessary to get to what is really the fourth floor but called the third floor knows that, but it's still going to be sad to see such a beautiful building destroyed.

We don't remember days only moments...

It's easy to imagine that, but is it reasonable to imagine that? I can imagine a lot of stuff about the future, but most of it will never come true. Just because something can be imagined doesn't mean that's a reason not to do it.